Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

A fabulous set of Possets commemorating and inspired by works by such poetic geniuses as Dickinson, Ginsberg, Whitman, and more.

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Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

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Possets' description: "There is something quite wicked about this perfume. There is a speck of creosote about it but that could be interpreted as a very fancy library as well. Parts of this smell like burning sage, and there is sage in it but how was it set on fire? Passion? There is something very appealing and familiar about it that I can't name. Sage and a papery essence which tempers the sage and makes it less sharp, a bit of lime, a cast of honey, a fist full of sea salt to represent tears."
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

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I tried this one (small patch) yesterday. I liked it so much, I want to do an official review of it today.

In the bottle: Mmmmm! What IS that?! It's almost like a dark cola met with pipe tobacco and stuffed some flowers and a tiny bit of earthiness in there.

On my skin: this comes across as a bit fizzy, but it's a dark fizzy. I get a faint whiff of saltiness mingled with a touch of brine, but it's not a harsh note. It's softened and faintly makes me think of The Shipman. The pipe tobacco note is a bitter/sweet note (without being smoky), and is almost chewy. The way it mingles with the salt and dark fizz is compelling.

As it dries: flower corpses begin to rise up a bit in here. It's floral, but not. It's almost like decaying flowers, but not. It's brilliant. I also get a faint almost hmmm what note is that...a dark cake note without heavy spices--a very dry dark cake note (edited to add that I think this is the note that came across as pipe tobacco above--as that note is already resolving away). The sea/salt vibe is present. I'm loving that dark fizz. It's like a really deep and dark cake champagne. It hints of decay without smelling like decay. I also get a very faint hmmmm almost Christmas candle note--if you took out the spices and the greenery (or lowered them down to almost gone) adding to this mix.

As it dries further: This is a deep dark summer done right. It's deep and dark without being heavy or cloying. The sea/salt note keeps it on the lighter edge, that dark fizz keeps riding along although it's dropping down a hair, the dark cake (with the spices taken out) note reminds me of my old room-mates rum cakes--but this is without the rum-alcohol note added. It's just deep and rich without having any chocolate or spices in it.

This is making me think of The Shipman, but The Shipman was sunshine and moonbeams compared to this. If The Shipman is the clear-eyed captain, this one is the naughty pirate who knows how to do interesting things to the wenches. After all, what fun are the high seas without a bit of pillaging in every port? :wink:

Final verdict: This ends with an almost anise vibe on me, but it's a softened anise, soft and almost woody. It retains that dark fizz for a while, then turns to cuddle. The salt in this is a gorgeous edge that keeps this interesting and shifting around for a while, and gives it that nautical slant that hints of summer. All in all, this isn't as dark as a summer night, but it is certainly evocative of high seas and swashbuckling pirates who prefer to do things away from the heat of the mid-day sun. Mmmmm so good.
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

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That sounds fascinating! I'm glad I have a decant on its way. Can you tell whether the pipe-tobacco note really is tobacco? (My skin amps the daylights out of it and turns any tobacco-containing fragrance to ashtray.)
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

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Oooo, this sounds loverly. Would you say it leans masculine? If so, it might be more for the hubby than me, but it does sound quite delicious.
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

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Petticoats wrote:That sounds fascinating! I'm glad I have a decant on its way. Can you tell whether the pipe-tobacco note really is tobacco? (My skin amps the daylights out of it and turns any tobacco-containing fragrance to ashtray.)
It is definitely not tobacco. It's the way the notes come together initially that make me think of it.

To Hill: I wouldn't say it's masculine--it's more androgynous. I think the sea/salt aspect make it a bit soft, but it's definitely not too soft. I think it would be perfectly wearable by all sexes.
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

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Maya wrote:
Petticoats wrote:That sounds fascinating! I'm glad I have a decant on its way. Can you tell whether the pipe-tobacco note really is tobacco? (My skin amps the daylights out of it and turns any tobacco-containing fragrance to ashtray.)
It is definitely not tobacco. It's the way the notes come together initially that make me think of it.
Whoo-hoo! Thank you for putting my mind at ease. Now I'm really looking forward to trying it. :)
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

Post by hill78 »

Sounds really intriguing and yummy. May have to add it to my next order!
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

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A brief update: I've had this on for quite a few hours now, and I was starting to get a really great soft and cool almost linen aspect from this. I double checked the notes and was 1) shocked to see that honey is in this because I get none (perhaps in the cake vibe?), and 2) rewarded to see the paper aspect. I think the sage is really playing around a lot in this one. I didn't even connect with sage at all, but looking at the notes made the light-bulb come on. It's a very cool and dry sage. Nothing Thanksgivingish at all. Well played, Fabienne!
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

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Sounds so intriguing! I'm leaning more towards this one than Waltzing Matilda now.
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Re: Charles Baudelaire--Les Fleurs du Mal

Post by hill78 »

Wet on my skin this is very acrid, I think that must be the burning sage/creosote. It is actually sort of pungent and unpleasant if I hold it close to my nose, but the waft of the scent isn't unpleasant at all. As it dries down, I begin to get the papery quality, and it sweetens a bit, which could be the honey, although my nose doesn't say "oh that's honey." The acrid quality from the initial wet stage is still present up close, but no longer noticeable in the throw. Once this is completely dry (may 30-45 minutes) the initial creosote and burning sage are gone, and what remains is very lovely. I can certainly see why Fabienne mentions a fancy library, I definitely get the smell of antique paper in here. It's like a lovely young lady librarian wearing a wonderful, feminine perfume in a beautiful library filled with antique books.

ETA: I just realized what that initial pungent smell reminds me of...a very strong, almost harsh leather note. Once it backs off and blends with the rest of the scent it is a beautiful counterpoint to the ladylike feeling of the overall scent.
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