Help! Book rut...

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katiushka
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Help! Book rut...

Post by katiushka »

I love classics, culture, the arts. I'm sure it's not true, but it seems like I've read most of the classics out there and am having a hard time finding a book to engross and inspire me. Any ideas? What have you read lately that you really loved?
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by Annemathematics »

My classics go-tos are Angela Carter's nights at the circus and the moonstone by ....ugh brain fart...wilkie Collins?

Lately I've been reading the discworld books by Terry pratchet thanks to the good old library. Douglas Adams hitchhiker books have been coming up a lot in conversations, and since I've never actually read any, I'm going to start on those soon too.

I just started Sally Mann's autobiography too soon to tell if I like it.

Please pardon all misspellings. The authors deserve better!
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by katiushka »

Annemathematics wrote:My classics go-tos are Angela Carter's nights at the circus and the moonstone by ....ugh brain fart...wilkie Collins?

Lately I've been reading the discworld books by Terry pratchet thanks to the good old library. Douglas Adams hitchhiker books have been coming up a lot in conversations, and since I've never actually read any, I'm going to start on those soon too.

I just started Sally Mann's autobiography too soon to tell if I like it.

Please pardon all misspellings. The authors deserve better!
I haven't read any of these yet - that gives me a lot of ideas! Thank you!
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by Annemathematics »

:frolic: if you end up reading any of the above, and find it anecdotally good or bad, please do share comments and opinions.
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by thesibylqueen »

katiushka wrote:I love classics, culture, the arts. I'm sure it's not true, but it seems like I've read most of the classics out there and am having a hard time finding a book to engross and inspire me. Any ideas? What have you read lately that you really loved?
Do you want less well known classic recommendations? Or books that read like a classic novel?

For less well known classics, I'm a huge Fanny Burney fan. Her novel, Evelina was Jane Austen's favorite, and for good reason -- it's a very dramatic and funny romance. I adore Sigrid Undset's Kristin Lavransdatter trilogy. Undset was, I believe, the first woman to win a Nobel prize for literature, and her three books in the series follow Kristin, a medieval Norwegian woman. It's so good, I was in tears at the end. I recommend the Tiina Nunnally translation personally as it's less ornate than the earlier translation. Miss Marjoribanks by Margaret Oliphant (or Mrs. Oliphant on older editions) is a very charming, funny novel of an Emma-esque young woman who sets about getting her father and everyone in her small village set right. Molly Make-Believe by Eleanor Hallowell Abbott is, like, the original chic-lit, an early 20th century novel of a young woman who writes letters to an invalid to cheer him up and, of course, they fall in love. Sweet and fun.

For books that "read" like classics, I recommend the books of Elizabeth Strout, Marilynne Robinson, Penelope Lively -- they're all very rich and character driven.

I could go on and on (I have a book blog, I love gushing about books so much) so if you want more specific recommendations, let me know!
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by fabienne »

Have you ever read Vanity Fair? It's captivating. A lot of people are put off by its size but I was lost in it for the best part of a month! Not obscure but not real well read. Same with War and Peace...that was so very very good that I almost cried at the end that it was over. I wanted more! Maybe I am just a glutton for a thick book.

Par Lankervist is excellent, he is a modern but reads like a classic. Obscure, yes. I love all of his tales, you might like The Dwarf (about a powerful court dwarf who lives in a Renaissance household and the intrigues which go on). Hesse's The Glass Bead Game is WELLL worth reading, twice.
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by katiushka »

thesibylqueen wrote:
katiushka wrote:I love classics, culture, the arts. I'm sure it's not true, but it seems like I've read most of the classics out there and am having a hard time finding a book to engross and inspire me. Any ideas? What have you read lately that you really loved?
Do you want less well known classic recommendations? Or books that read like a classic novel?

For less well known classics, I'm a huge Fanny Burney fan. Her novel, Evelina was Jane Austen's favorite, and for good reason -- it's a very dramatic and funny romance. I adore Sigrid Undset's Kristin Lavransdatter trilogy. Undset was, I believe, the first woman to win a Nobel prize for literature, and her three books in the series follow Kristin, a medieval Norwegian woman. It's so good, I was in tears at the end. I recommend the Tiina Nunnally translation personally as it's less ornate than the earlier translation. Miss Marjoribanks by Margaret Oliphant (or Mrs. Oliphant on older editions) is a very charming, funny novel of an Emma-esque young woman who sets about getting her father and everyone in her small village set right. Molly Make-Believe by Eleanor Hallowell Abbott is, like, the original chic-lit, an early 20th century novel of a young woman who writes letters to an invalid to cheer him up and, of course, they fall in love. Sweet and fun.

For books that "read" like classics, I recommend the books of Elizabeth Strout, Marilynne Robinson, Penelope Lively -- they're all very rich and character driven.

I could go on and on (I have a book blog, I love gushing about books so much) so if you want more specific recommendations, let me know!
Wow - thank you so much! I haven't ready any of these, and look forward to exploring them :frolic:
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by katiushka »

fabienne wrote:Have you ever read Vanity Fair? It's captivating. A lot of people are put off by its size but I was lost in it for the best part of a month! Not obscure but not real well read. Same with War and Peace...that was so very very good that I almost cried at the end that it was over. I wanted more! Maybe I am just a glutton for a thick book.

Par Lankervist is excellent, he is a modern but reads like a classic. Obscure, yes. I love all of his tales, you might like The Dwarf (about a powerful court dwarf who lives in a Renaissance household and the intrigues which go on). Hesse's The Glass Bead Game is WELLL worth reading, twice.
Thank you, Fabienne! War and Peace is one of my all-time favorites! I have not ready Vanity Fair, so I will definitely look into it. I have also not read any of the other books, so I look forward to exploring them.
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by Petticoats »

Seconding Vanity Fair. I'm a big Victorian fan (which will come as no surprise to anyone who's read my books!), and some of my favorites from that era are Jane Eyre (Charlotte Bronte--and if you've read JE already, try her Villette), Middlemarch (George Eliot), Bleak House (Dickens), and The Woman in White (Wilkie Collins).

For a more recent saga about the end of the Victorian era, John Galsworthy's The Forsyte Saga is addictive.
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Re: Help! Book rut...

Post by Atropos »

IF I might jump in late, I am in love and rereading a Detective Noir series with a twist, it's in a fantasy world. A series by Glen Cook with a detective named Garrett. He lives in a city called Tun Faire, his best friend is a half dark elf named Morley Dotes who is a bone breaker and life taker. There are Grolls (Giant, Troll, hybrids) pixies, and every fantasy creature and magic of course. His partner is the Dead Man, a centuries old creature called a Loghyr who don't just die because you kill their body, who is created in the vein of Nero Wolfe.
I love this series. It's got humor, fantasy, murder, mayhem, and Garrett has plenty of flaws he'll tell you all about. I find it really engrossing.The first book in the series is Sweet Silver Blues, and yes, in true Noir fashion the titles all have elements in them. The second book is Bitter Gold Hearts. The first few books are shorter, but they get longer as the series goes on. While I loved the Wizard series they made into a TV show for Sci Fy channel, I would rather see this one made into a show.

And Tam LIn (based on a classic poem by Childe) with a modern twist set in a college in the late sixties early seventies by Pamela Dean. And she has another series I adore In the "Secret County" series. Three books to it. I love her writing, and she has her characters quote the Bard a lot, so it's like getting your classics fix. :rofl: sorta.

And of course when I done, I'll recommend my own short story retelling of classic Fairy Tales, which will tie to my novel series. I'll tell you when those are free. hehee.
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