How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Want to talk about just about anything? Start a topic here.

Moderator: Maya

etienne
archangel
archangel
Posts: 267
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by etienne »

Fabienne or anyone else - is there a difference between the "shelf life" of oils made with man made components compared to all EO based oils? And do they age differently? I know many EO based oils last for years when stored properly and only get better with age, but is that so with fragrance oil based ones too? Just wondering if I should start slathering mine on a bit more generously rather than hoarding them, it would be sad if they went "off" before I can get a chance to use them up. :smile:
User avatar
fabienne
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 5731
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Contact:

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by fabienne »

From what I have seen, it really depends on the class of the perfume components. With so's the citrus oils don't keep as long as the patchouli's and other resinous ones. I don't think I would want to keep a good rose around forever but I could be wrong here as there are a lot of different roses and not all of them are going to react alike to heat and time. As for the synthetics, they are not eternal but often do have a long shelf life. I notce that if there is a straight on candy tone to it it might go sour on you. So a candy like part might signal to "drink up now" like most of the wine you find in the grocery store,it's made to enjoy now. I wish I could be more particular, as the are some candies which have a fantastic shelf life. This is another good topic for a podcast.
I have sniffed the Panties of Ptah!
Pony
a spark
a spark
Posts: 14
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by Pony »

Oh, we're on the subject of commercial perfumes? Ack. For many years I wore 1000 by Jean Patou. I really liked it. Then many years of being bare-naked (scentwise) until I stumbled upon artisan perfumes on the net. Now I am quite the addict.

For Christmas I sent out many perfumes care-samplers to family & friends. In return, one of my lovely friends sent me a sampler from her favorite: Fragonard. Now Fragonard is based in Grasse itself, and is somewhat famous...lots of premotional literature came with it...

UGH! They were horrible, smelling of alcohol and cheap aldehydes. I was forced to regift. I felt like a bad person but I couldn't stand the odor. Dh banned me from his mancave after I walked in there with some on. Gave him a headache.

It really is a shame that commercial perfumers are all churning out those acrid, flat blends. Do people really LIKE them better????
rachel2205
preternatural being
preternatural being
Posts: 221
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by rachel2205 »

I think like other people have said, perfume houses are often now making scents that have top notes that are immediately appealing. And those who buy them don't want scents they need to think about or appreciate over the time it's on their skin. They just seem to want BLAM! I like a bit more subtlety in what I go for.
ivy_fiddlefox
archangel
archangel
Posts: 303
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by ivy_fiddlefox »

I do too miss the spray fun of "regular" perfumes and I would love to somehow convert some of my bottle to spray bottles, however doesn't this dilute the scent? how can you mix the right amount of whatever your mixing it with without messing it up? would adding spring water be ok? I do have someone else I buy perfume sprays on etsy who makes lovely ones but they are a mixture of water, alcohol and perfume oils (they don't last very long though) She's also starting to make some regular oils and dry oil sprays though...
don't know if I should be talking about other etailers here... no competition though! I think everyone has their own signature way of making perfume which makes it so wonderful.
Galen
moderator
moderator
Posts: 377
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by Galen »

however doesn't this dilute the scent?
I imagine it does, but with a spray bottle you apply a lot more spray mixture than the dainty little dabs of oil I apply from a Possets bottle....

how can you mix the right amount of whatever your mixing it with without messing it up?

as you commented above, it's dilution - you can't mess it up, you can just make it too strong or too weak. Experimentation seems to help with this, and different oils need different ratios. Luckily you can always add either more oil or more spray material.

would adding spring water be ok?
I tried this a long time ago and it wasn't bad, but it didn't work very well. You have to shake like crazy every single time you use it, and it doesn't seem to carry the scent quite as well. You could give it a try with a small amount, and see if it works for you.

I use a "silk liquid" that is similar to dry oil spray but not greasy - my UK supplier is here : http://www.theperfumeryuk.com/id14.html

Just a caution : if you google for silk liquid you get a lot of "intimate" products coming back!
Soapy955
archangel
archangel
Posts: 308
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by Soapy955 »

I don't think that it's necessarily true that people prefer commercial perfumes, I think it's just that they haven't experienced the lovely oils that are available; especially from Possets; and therefore don't know what they are missing. If they only know about the commercial ones, and buy into the advertising and hype and peer pressure to get that stuff then they will always stay with the big perfume houses!
MollyG
preternatural being
preternatural being
Posts: 116
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by MollyG »

I've been wanting to chime in on this topic for a while... it's so interesting!

There is disagreement over the extent to which body chemistry affects perfume. I know that perfumers who also create custom scents for people do usually do some kind of skin chemistry analysis on their clients... though truthfully, I'm not sure whether that analysis tells the perfumer about their client's skin chemistry so much as it is that person's preferences. It's hard to know and I am definitely not an expert. :tongue: In the book Perfumes: The Guide, Luca Turin (a biophysicist-turned-perfume-critic who has spent his career studying olfaction) argues that "skin chemistry" is mostly B.S. He says that when scents smell different on two people, it is usually in the top and middle notes of a perfume; different body temperatures will cause fragrances to evaporate at different rates, but after an hour or so, when the fragrance has dried down to its basenotes, it will smell the same on both people.

Is this true? I don't know, and I have never had a willing partner-in-crime to test this theory with me. (My nearest and dearest friends aren't as perfume-geeky as me. LOL) Personally. I still buy into the idea of some sort of body chemistry, if for no other reason than that things like diet and medications have been known to alter the smell of bodily fluids. (Asparagus pee, anyone?) The climate you live in, the food you eat, and the meds you may take have to have some influence over how a fragrance smells on you. That's impossible to measure for a couple of reasons, though. For one, scent is ephemeral... there is no way you can capture what a fragrance smelled like on you a week ago compared to today, because it's long gone. But also, our noses are subjective. Have you ever adored a new perfume only to be lukewarm about it a month or two later?

As for whether rubbing your wrists together bruises the molecules of perfume, that is definitely not true. What you are doing there is generating heat through friction and causing your perfume to evaporate more quickly. I don't rub my alcohol-based fragrances, but I will gently smoosh my wrists together with oils to spread them evenly.
puck_nc
principalities
principalities
Posts: 657
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by puck_nc »

Add me to the list of those who are so over department store perfumes. I never wore much perfume before getting into BPAL and then Possets; I had a bottle of Poison and a bottle of Colours by Bennetton for special occasions and that was it. But now if I try any of that wall of smell in a department store, it's all alcohol, alcohol, alcohol.
thelaurenator
a spark
a spark
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed May 02, 2012 1:45 pm

How to appreciate perfume, and perfume quirks, etc.

Post by thelaurenator »

Department store perfumes are by and large disgusting. I do like the Cocos from Chanel, though the original Coco is a bit 80's. I also love the discontinued No.22. (though it definitely is somewhat "tinny and acrid," however, I don't seem to mind the somewhat odd combination of white florals and aldehydes). Also, I do like Juicy Couture and have a large bottle of it, though I find too much makes me feel ill. (I haven't tried the new one, Viva la Juicy, but judging by its popularity it's probably an awful scent. People have awful taste in perfume!) For me, the true test of a tolerable perfume is whether I can wear it while eating. Has anyone ever had the experience of eating a forkful of something delicious and having the taste be marred by the assault of garish florals and musk floating up to your nose? Ugh! I've been on the verge of nausea from department store scents MORE THAN once because of this very experience!

So far I am loving Possets, even though I'm new.
Post Reply